I believe in individualised treatment plans, tailored to meet the needs of women diagnosed with breast cancer to ensure that patients are involved in the decisions relating to their treatment. 

I believe in individualised treatment plans, tailored to meet the needs of women diagnosed with breast cancer to ensure that patients are involved in the decisions relating to their treatment. 

 Risk factors of breast cancer 

Family history of breast cancer 
Family history of breast and ovarian cancer is an important factor in determining patients lifetime risk of breast cancer. The majority of breast cancers are not familial or inherited. Women who have family members who were diagnosed with breast cancer at an early age or have multiple family members with breast and ovarian cancer may be at increased risk of developing breast cancer. During the consultation Mr Sarakbi will ask patients about relatives who have had breast cancer. A detailed assessment by a clinician and possibly a referral to a genetic service may be required if patients have a strong family history of breast cancer. NICE (National Institute of care and clinical Excellence) has issued new guidelines with regards to genetic testing for hereditary breast cancer, which can be read by clicking here. 
 
Age 
Your risk of developing breast cancer increases as you get older. At least four out of five of all breast cancer cases in the UK are in women over the age of 50. Breast cancer is uncommon in women under the age of 40. 
 
Early puberty and late menopause 
Women who started their periods at an early age and women who go through the menopause later have a slightly increased risk of breast cancer. This slight increase in risk is probably because these women are exposed to the naturally occurring female hormone (oestrogen) for longer than women who go through the menopause earlier or start their periods at an older age. 
 
Alcohol 
Regular consumption of alcohol leads to an increased risk of developing breast cancer. For every 100 women who drink one typical drink a day (for example, a standard 175ml glass of wine) there will be an extra two women who develop breast cancer when compared with 100 women who don’t drink alcohol at all. The more alcohol you drink, the more your risk is increased. Alcohol consumption is a life style risk factor that you can modify. If you want to reduce your risk of breast cancer you need to reduce your alcohol intake. 
 
Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and the oral contraceptive pill 
Taking HRT to treat symptoms of the menopause can increase your risk of breast cancer. The longer you use HRT the greater the risk. The good news is that the increase in breast cancer risk begins to fall as soon as you stop taking HRT, no matter how many years you’ve taken it for. 
 
Taking the pill also leads to a slight increase in your risk of breast cancer. Ten years after stopping the pill this risk decreases to match the average population risk. 
Reducing your risk of breast cancer 
There are certain factors and life style changes that can reduce your risk of breast cancer: 
Breast feeding 
Healthy diet 
Women who have had children are at lower risk of breast cancer in the long term than women who never had children. 
The age at which you have children affects your risk of developing breast cancer. The earlier a woman begins her family, the lower her risk of breast cancer. 
Daily exercise: 30 minutes of daily exercise such as walking, cycling, or any moderate exercise can reduce your risk of developing breast cancer. 
 
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